Halloween

One of my fav holiday is Halloween. Decoration and ambiance are wonderful, and let a big place to imagination. It’s a lovely fest for creepy girls like me 😉

I love decorate my house and i’m so proud of the result 😉

One of the best things about it is probably too pumpkin flavor in almost everything you can eat and drink :p  coffee pumpkin latte and  pumpkin pie are my fav choice.

22046822_357956341311298_6766091710743551941_n 22050230_357955951311337_3818194351637005974_n

22048004_357956657977933_472882819423109281_o

22050929_357955827978016_1714976788309606704_o.jpg

What is the origin of Halloween?

Halloween is a traditional folklore and pagan festival originating from the Anglos-Celts Islands celebrated on the evening of October 31, the eve of the Christian All Saints’ Day. Its name is a contraction of English All Hallows-Even which means the eve of All Saints ‘Day in contemporary English and can be translated as « All Saints’ Day ».

Despite its Christian and English origins, the vast majority of sources present Halloween as a legacy of the pagan festival of Samain, which was celebrated in early autumn by the Celts and constituted for them a kind of feast of the new year.

22137039_357956461311286_2375954059324478531_o

It is a very popular festival in Ireland, Scotland and Wales where there are many historical accounts of its existence. Jack-o’-lantern, the emblematic Halloween lantern, is itself the result of an Irish legend.

It was from the seventh century under Pope Gregory III and, in the following century, under Pope Gregory IV, that the Catholic Church moved the feast of All Saints’ Day, which could be celebrated until after Easter or after Pentecost, on the 1st of November, thus christianizing the feasts of Samain.

22089308_357955887978010_6279360135412582854_n

The Halloween celebration was introduced in the United States and Canada after the massive arrival of Irish and Scottish emigrants in particular following the Great Famine in Ireland (1845-1851). It gained popularity there from the 1920s and it is on the new continent that the lanterns Jack-o’-lanterns made from pumpkins, local origin, replace the rutabagas used in Europe.

Halloween is celebrated today mainly in Ireland, Great Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and to a lesser extent in many other countries. The most well-known modern tradition is that children dress up in scary costumes and ring at the doors, asking for treats with the formula: Trick or treat! which means « sweets or a spell! » « . The evening can also be marked by bonfires, fireworks, children’s games, reading horrific tales or Halloween poems, broadcasting horror movies

 

Legend about it:

Jack-o’-lantern is probably the most popular character associated with Halloween. It comes from an old Irish tale. Jack would have been a miser, a drunken, wicked and egocentric character. One evening, when he was in a tavern, the devil appeared to him and demanded his soul. Jack asks the devil to offer him a drink, a last drink before leaving for hell. The devil accepts and turns into a sixpence piece. Jack seizes her and immediately places her in her purse. The latter having a lock in the shape of a cross, the devil can not escape from it. Finally, Jack agreed to release the devil, provided the latter gave him ten more years to live. Ten years later, Jack made another farce to the devil, leaving him on top of a tree (on which he had carved a cross with his knife) with the promise that he would no longer pursue him.

22136982_357956077977991_240981687520803522_o

When Jack dies, entry to heaven is denied, and the devil also refuses to let him enter hell. Jack nevertheless succeeded in convincing the devil to give him a piece of burning coal to illuminate his way in the dark. He places the coal in a turnip dug as a lantern and is condemned to wander aimlessly until the day of the Last Judgment. He is then named Jack of the Lantern, or Jack-o’-lantern. It reappears every year, the day of his death, at Halloween.

22051329_357955984644667_4942758250753631872_o22051271_357956174644648_4344707670700908195_o

Lagoon Field Toads

The Wilden Marsh Blog

Thousands of toads and frogs are living in the Lagoon Field. The toads leave the Lagoon Field every year around 9th March; they walk across the Northern Corridor to mate in North Pond at the southern end of the Swamp. The Northern Corridor and North Pond Pasture are covered with them – I have to be very careful where I place my feet to avoid squashing them. After a couple of weeks of vigorous mating, they return to the Lagoon Field for rest and recuperation until the same time next year.

The toads are a food source for heron and otters, I guess mink take advantage of the glut too. The herons snip off the toads’ heads with their beaks, and turn them inside out to eat: the toad’s skin tastes horrible. Otters launch themselves into North Pond after dark, making tremendous splashes: they grab a…

Voir l’article original 8 mots de plus